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MSBBC DRM

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Yep, in case you didn’t know, BBC now stands for WTF?

“With today’s launch of the iPlayer, the BBC Trust has failed in its most basic of duties and handed over to Microsoft sole control of the on-line distribution of BBC programming. From today, you will need to own a Microsoft operating system to view BBC programming on the web. This is akin to saying you must own a Sony TV set to watch BBC TV. And you must accept the Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) that the iPlayer imposes. You simply cannot be allowed to be in control of your computer according to the BBC.” – Link (via)

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Balance of Power

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The more that social networks pick up steam, the less influence blogging is receiving. Personal publishing is really exploding right now, indirectly, by people simply revealing their lives as content. Blogging is a much smaller piece of the pie. The web is better able to categorize everyones day-to-day ideas, in all forms of media, and thus these ideas have become more organized and useful for all.

Specifically, the dynamics of this influence coming from Facebook, Flickr and Linked-in-like communities is not very apparent. The overall influence or authority is for the most part, hidden. Maybe that’s a good thing for now, while it lasts.

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Alexa in the News

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Cmdr Taco, tears apart Alexa, and leaves the Slashdot community to weigh in. It’s not looking good for Alexa [in case you haven’t noticed, I have had a few words to say about Alexa myself].

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Rocketboom on the iPhone

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Today we release our first application significant more so as a sign of whats to come from within our group:

If you have an iPhone, just navigate to this link:
http://rocketboom.com/iphone/

Here is a demo of what it should look like(video flip not in demo):
http://rocketboom.com/iphone/demo

Considering we have never even tested it on an iPhone, we still have some work to do this weekend Im sure just to get v0.1 up to par.

This application is outstanding for us not because it’s designed as yet another standalone Rocketboom player, but due to our primary intent to make it available as a player that anyone can easily customize for their own show.

There have been lots of things I’ve built for Rocketboom over the years, but Ive never had the resources to do anything with them or take them to the next level. I always wanted to for even more ideas come up than I could ever take action on.

Enter our superstar programmer Jamie Wilkinson who has been a saving grace the last few months. When we decided to take on this particular project about 3 days ago, Jamie put it together almost overnight. This weekend we’ll test and spiffy up the player (still dedicated for Rocketboom) and next week, once we have a grip on the iphone standards, we hope to release the custom functionality so anyone can use it for their own show, or their own favorite shows.

I’ve always been really transparent about everything because I still dont believe in competition for the show, Rocketboom, but this is for a new business (along with RB and other shows in development) so the plan is to keep our other ideas under wraps until they are up. Nevertheless, we plan to work mostly within a GPL when spinning things off.

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Paying Bloggers to Write

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Shouldn’t Microsoft and Federated Media at least understand why shilling is wrong for a lot of bloggers and stop trying to sell dishonesty?

Michael at Techcrunch said he doesn’t care about what he wrote for Microsoft even though he signed his name to it. Yet he signed his name for me – someone who admires and looks up to his opinions. That is why Microsoft had him do it – so I would believe in Microsoft indirectly.

This whole chain of events – Microsoft paying bloggers to write for them for this reason, Federated Media promoting the idea to their clients knowing best what the implications would be and the clients agreeing to do it – shows a major sign of laziness or a desperate need for banner ad money.

** I always assumed these ads were quotes bought from prior articles or blog posts written by the blogger, without being payed to write them **

Apparently, people who value journalistic integrity and transparecy of information are willing to write messages they don’t believe in just for money, in the very same way they write on their blogs, about the same stuff, to the same people who read them, in the same space and in the same place.

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Eyetag IPTV Benchmarking Study

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From the German conference I keynoted last week, The Brain Behind on Web-TV and IPTV, a very noteworthy article from Eyetag ( Nikolaus Reinelt and Bertram Gugel):

“Increasingly, a separation between Internet TV as “Over-the-top” distribution and telco IPTV as a new “institutionalized” means of distribution, becomes difficult to make.”

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The Death of Alexa’s Toolbar

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What do each of these graphs have in common? It appears that they all show a decline in people who use the Alexa Toolbar.

digg:

boingboing:

techcrunch:

rocketboom:

scripting:

I still have never met an Alexa toolbar user. Do you know of one?

Rocketboom was static for awhile and has been on a steady upward incline all year. Why is Alexa showing a sharp downward trend?

I just spent about an hour searching the net on Alexa and all I could find were stories of people telling others to instal the toolbar so they could increase their own ranking. I did find that Vista considers Alexa malware and there is no planned support for Firefox or Safari.

Technorati is based on actual links:

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Wallstrip

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Congrats to Wallstrip for selling to CBS for a reported $5million. This evaluation is great news for Rocketbooom and others in our field. The gap between established media and new media is turning more and more into media.

I’ve been feeling concerned about our burn rate to late but it looks like Rocketboom spends just a fraction of what Wallstrip spends.

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Not Just a Name

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Your order confirmation:
07/02/2007 – 07/02/2010 Domain renewal: rocketboom.com $28.35

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Why do Video Platforms Fail?

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In online video, there is big interest in the entry point, the place where people go to discover and watch video and ultimately where payment is made, one way or another, for the watching. For some incredible reason that I can not fathom, an extraordinarily large number of people believe they can create the entry point in which the rest of the world will come to discover video. The competition is fierce and the success rate over the years has been a series of clockwork dead on arrivals.

This entry point offline used to be TV-Guide for TV content along with local newspapers for Movie listings, both “dead sources”, so to speak. In music, a company called Sound Warehouse once dominated America as the entry point for musical recording sales, physically, and now it’s completely gone.

Meanwhile, musicians only needed a cheap and clear signal-to-noise ratio to record sound with while the audience only needed dial-up to d/l the music with, to bring on the democratization of the music industry regardless of the pre-established industry’s control.

The traditional TV/Movie/Film studios have not been as afraid of the internet recently, having had the opportunity to stand by and watch their music industry colleagues break down. Easily anticipating awhile back what has now become cheap and clear imaging to record and edit the world with, a new audience has now materialized only needing to click once to see anything by anyone.

Still yet, the pre-established studios have been reliant on 3rd parties (i.e. Silicon Valley) to solve their technological deficiencies, or they continue to not listen at all, and have rolled-out tripping.

Does anyone remember a site called Open Media Network? It used to be the biggest thing to hit the internet the day before it released but it took me 20 minutes to remember the name and find it just now. Mark Andreessen (orig. leader of Netscape) was on the board and they signed on PBS.

What about Current.tv? They are still here but they decided to go up stream for some reason, as if to provide friction for the rest industry moving online. Many people like myself were jaw dropped to consider the impact the same amount of money and action could have made globally with a strategy that was predominantly based on internet audiences.

What about MTV’s big online effort? No one on a Mac could get in. And so what’s next? The $25 Million in private equity Roo partner? MTV has been doing short-form content for a LONG time, but hasn’t been doing so hot transitioning onto the internet.

What happened to Akimbo’s $27Million?

What about AT&T Homezone’s all-in-one wonder box? Apparently a fresh new $1.6Billion has been alloted to push subscribers. Golly.

A current press release states that Brightcove ($59Million injection this year), once THE most promising player in the world (before it was released) “recently added an update to the Brightcove Platform that included several new features and a number of great enhancements to our services”. Jeremy Allaire first created Cold Fusion which is a very different kind of venture.

Ever hear of Innertube, CBS.com’s effort? According to today’s Wall Street Journal “CBS’s new chief Internet strategist now jokes that the Web address for Innertube should be CBS.com/nobodycomeshere”.

Now CBS (and thus now Wallstrip) will divert their brand energies to someone else’s brand to give it a whirl, Joost: “Joost gets a $45Million extra.

Posts that contain Joost per day for the last 30 days.
Technorati Chart

Maybe today’s most likely contender will spark, I can’t say I will be surprised to see that there is something which makes this one THE one, but at the very least, the risk for Joost, I think, is totally beside itself and it’s hard to imagine, just based on history, that this is going to work.

Why are these always going wrong or why are they not going better?

TOP TEN REASONS WHY VIDEO PLATFORMS FAIL:

1. Insubstantial library of content
2. Poor bit rates
3. Lack of innovation (clone platform)
4. No share in content ownership rights
5. No exclusivity of content distribution
6. Lack of spark/spirit for a centralized community
7. Need for users to d/l proprietary software
8. Awkward interface design
9. Overly excessive emphasis on rights protection
10. Lack of technological foresight & audience expectations

Most noteworthy, I have always suggested that an individual show may thrive best when allowed to live and breathe in its own home, on it’s own website, best suited for it’s own special case. A video player is one brand, a network is another and each individual show is itself a brand. If the show is unique and special, it will find its own identity and own distinct audience in it’s own authentic location.

There is still certainly PLENTY of room for new, quality video content, the kind of entertaining content that Hollywood has traditionally been masters of so the competition is low in the creative studio department, the audiences are growing, business model options are progressing at least – there certainly are plenty of distribution partner options – it seems to be a wonderful time to create video that people respond to online.

As for the audiences, they like to get it in different ways at all kinds of different places. No matter where the big party is, or where the authentic home base may be, hopefully the content can make it’s way easily into the growing number of scenes on the growing number of screens.

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